Vein Clinic

MEET OUR VEIN SPECIALISTS

Casey Cable, MD

  • SPECIALTY: Vascular and Interventional Radiology
  • MEDICAL SCHOOL: University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington
  • INTERNSHIP: General Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee
  • RESIDENCY: Vascular and Interventional Radiology Integrated Residency, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee
  • FELLOWSHIP: Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee

Ryne W. Dougherty, MD, MBA

  • SPECIALTY: Vascular and Interventional Radiology
  • MEDICAL SCHOOL: Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minnesota
  • INTERNSHIP: Transitional Internship, Sacred Heart Hospital, Spokane, Washington
  • RESIDENCY: Vascular and Interventional Radiology Integrated Residency, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • FELLOWSHIP: University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan

WHAT IS VENOUS INSUFFICIENCY?

Venous insufficiency is a condition in which the veins in the legs are unable to properly circulate blood back to the heart. This can occur due to a variety of reasons, including damage to the valves within the veins or weakened vein walls. When the valves within the veins are damaged or weakened, they are unable to properly prevent the backflow of blood, which results in a buildup of pressure in the veins.

Over time, this increased pressure can cause the veins to become dilated and enlarged, leading to the development of varicose veins. In addition to varicose veins, venous insufficiency can also cause other symptoms such as leg swelling, pain and skin changes.

Risk factors for developing venous insufficiency include:

  • Age: As we age, the valves within our veins can become weaker and less effective.
  • Gender: Women are more likely to develop venous insufficiency than men, possibly due to hormonal differences or the pressure placed on veins during pregnancy.
  • Family history: A family history of venous insufficiency can increase your risk of developing the condition.
  • Obesity: Excess weight places additional pressure on the veins in the legs, which can contribute to venous insufficiency.
  • Inactivity: A sedentary lifestyle can lead to poor circulation, which can contribute to the development of venous insufficiency.
  • Smoking: Smoking damages the blood vessels and can contribute to the development of venous insufficiency.

Overall, venous insufficiency is a common condition that can cause significant discomfort and, if left untreated, can lead to serious complications. If you are experiencing symptoms of venous insufficiency, it is important to speak with a healthcare professional to receive a proper diagnosis and explore treatment options that can help improve your vein health and reduce your risk of complications.

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS

Venous insufficiency can have several symptoms including:

  • Leg swelling, cramping, pain or aching
  • Skin changes such as discoloration, thickening or ulceration
  • Varicose veins or spider veins
  • Restless legs
  • Fatigue or heaviness in the legs
  • Itching or burning sensation

 

Consequences of Venous Insufficiency

It is important to have venous insufficiency treated because it can progress and cause serious complications. If left untreated, it can lead to blood clots, skin changes and chronic pain. In severe cases, it can lead to skin ulcerations and infections. If left untreated, it can lead to:

  • Blood clots (deep vein thrombosis)
  • Skin changes and ulcerations
  • Chronic pain and discomfort
  • Decreased mobility and quality of life
  • Higher risk for infections

Treatment Options

Your physician will discuss with you the best treatment option for your condition. Options may include the following. Each of these outpatient procedures are minimally invasive and typically take less than hour to complete.

Radio Frequency Ablation (RFA)

This treatment uses heat energy to close off diseased veins. A small incision is made in the skin and a catheter is inserted into the vein, delivering radio frequency energy to the vein and causing it to shrink and collapse. The blood flow is then redirected to healthier veins.

VenaSeal

VenaSeal is a minimally invasive treatment that uses medical-grade adhesive to close off diseased veins. A small catheter is inserted into the vein and a small amount of adhesive is injected. The adhesive then seals the vein shut, allowing blood to be redirected to healthier veins.

Sclerotherapy

This treatment involves injecting a solution directly into the vein that causes it to scar and collapse. The body then reabsorbs the vein over time. This treatment is often used for smaller veins and spider veins.

Microphlebectomy

This treatment involves the removal of varicose veins through small incisions in the skin. This procedure is often used for larger varicose veins that cannot be treated with other minimally invasive techniques.